5 things to know about copyright and education

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I recently attended a free workshop here on campus instructed by Jennifer Church-Duran.  She shared a lot of great information about how to stay within the legal lines when it comes to copyright and fair use.   Here are 5 tips that are good reminders for us all.

1. What is Fair Use? It allows for the potential of use without permission or payment.   Not all educational or research uses of copyright-protected materials are considered fair use.

2. What is favored under Fair Use guidelines? The reason for which you are using any material is important.  Protection under the guidelines usually includes teaching, research, nonprofit education, criticism, parody, transformative, scholarship, commentary, and news reporting.

3. Amount of work being used. Keep it small and limited.  Make sure the portion you are using is not the central point or significant to the entire work.  A good rule of thumb is to not exceed 10% of the total page count of any book and no more than one chapter from a single book.

4. Makin’ Copies. The copies being made cannot replace the purchasing of actual textbooks, periodicals, or publishers’ reprints.   If use a copy (think text, video, audio) during one school semester, it doesn’t necessarily mean you can use it the next semester.  For online classes, make sure the material posted is only available for one semester.  If you reuse the entire class, you should get permission.

5. More information. Jennifer suggested several fantastic sites to help you perform a self-check if you have questions. Check out:

And here’s a previous blog entry by Aaron:

Image: teachingsagittarian on Flickr

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Amber Nutt

Amber Nutt is an Education Support Technologist at the University of Kansas.
  • http://stratepedia.org/ Aaron

    Amber, did she talk about Creative Commons or public domain at all?

  • http://stratepedia.org/ Aaron

    Amber, did she talk about Creative Commons or public domain at all?

  • Amber

    She touched on it, but there is more information in the post I linked to above.

  • Amber

    She touched on it, but there is more information in the post I linked to above.